Solar Moonshot program

“If not us, who?  If not now, when?”
― John F. Kennedy

The Solar Moonshot Program is helping nonprofit organizations across the United States make the switch to solar power in 2020.  Grants are available up to $25,000 and priority is given to projects that have additional funding sources and community support.  Grants are made possible by the Left Coast Fund, and the program is managed by Hammond Climate Solutions.  Learn more about the program's status and participants below!

Solar Moonshot Project Map

The Solar Moonshot Program is a nationwide initiative - see below for our project locations to date.

Solar Moonshot Participants

This program has proudly assisted the following organizations in going solar, reducing their carbon footprint while saving money to be reinvested into their mission.  
Learn more about their contribution towards ending the climate crisis below.

System Description:
12
kW-DC,
Solar Power System

Kroka Expeditions

Marlow, New Hampshire
While we know that solar technologies are not 100% efficient nor fully sustainable, it is an important and critical step forward to utilize these technologies so that they become better and more financially accessible over time. Regenerative practices in every sphere of human activity, including harnessing the energy of the sun, are essential action steps for humans to take if we wish to sustain life on this planet. Here on our campus, we have perfect exposure, and installing photovoltaic panels was just one piece of the puzzle in divorcing our infrastructure from fossil fuels while investing in clean energy sources. We plan to install solar thermal, micro hydro and wind systems, and already use a wood boiler for heat as well as composting toilets and grey water systems for our waste. We will also be sharing our sustainably produced energy with our community by tying into the grid. At Kroka, education is our goal, and as such we teach children about energy sustainability so that they may learn and become invested in pursuing sustainability work in their future. We are also highly committed to both teaching our students and dedicating ourselves to practicing energy conservation, to reduce our consumption of electricity on campus. With the financial savings from this project, we will be using our resources to provide scholarships to more students who are in need of financial aid.
-Misha Golfman, Co-Founder & Executive Director
Environmental Benefit Equivalencies
290492
Pounds of Coal Burned
45
Homes' Electricity Use for 1 Year
344
Acres of U.S. Forest CO2 Sequestration for 1 Year
System Description:
9
kW-DC,
Solar and Storage

Ekvn-Yefolecv

Weogufka, Alabama
"Ekvn-Yefolecv is an intentional ecovillage community of Indigenous Maskoke persons who, after 180 years of having been forcibly removed from traditional Alabama homelands, have returned for the purpose of practicing linguistic, cultural and ecological sustainability. The term Ekvn-Yefolecv implicitly embodies a double entendre: 1) Returning to the earth, 2) Returning to our homelands. With only a handful of speakers remaining, we are revitalizing the Maskoke language with children through an immersion program in which Maskoke language is the sole medium of instruction, and curriculum centers on traditional agricultural and ecological knowledge. Designed as a holistic decolonization paradigm shift, residents of the ecovillage are manifesting an off-grid income-sharing community with natural building construction and renewable energy. We are also reintroducing threatened animal species, sacred to Maskoke people, namely buffalo and sturgeon, while growing hierloom crops in a deliberate effort to decolonize our diets. Ekvn-Yefolecv mandates the revival of traditional Maskoke matriarchy and governance systems, and we practice ethnobotanical conservation, particularly for the preservation of women's medicinal knowledge and food foraging. Ekvn-Yefolecv exemplifies a departure from extractive economy and engages a collective effort to bring healing to a long abused Earth Mother, as well as to heal an Indigenous People long inflicted by intergenerational trauma. The vision seeks to serve as an archetype for other Indigenous communities to model for Just Transition to more equitable and culturally/linguistically sustainable lifeways. Solar power is not only the primary energy source for community buildings, but through a solar array, our dependence on Hvse (Sun) for cooling and powering LED lights, for instance, reinvigorates our traditional cosmological worldview wherein we daily offer gratitude to Hvse (Sun) - a sacred manifestation of Creator."
-Marcus Briggs-Cloud, President
Environmental Benefit Equivalencies
231888
Pounds of Coal Burned
36
Homes' Electricity Use for 1 Year
275
Acres of U.S. Forest CO2 Sequestration for 1 Year
System Description:
27
kW-DC,
Solar Power System

The DREAM Program

Fletcher, Vermont
"As we learned more about the educational impact of the COVID-19 crisis on our DREAMers, it became clear that sustaining connection and providing enrichment opportunities over the summer would be critical. Youth are experiencing a significant gap in education and connection to caring adults. This gap, as is often the case, disproportionally affects the most vulnerable in our communities. Rather than suspend operations, we hired on our largest team of summer counselors to date, to work closely, in a virtual setting, with each of our DREAMers, in order to ensure that they would be engaged in learning and connecting over the summer months. While this usually includes overnight camping at Camp DREAM with an outdoors/environmental program focus, we instead offered a virtual camp. The virtual camp was delivered by a team of camp counselors living at Camp DREAM, and included a variety of environmental and adventure activities (this usually involved an initial online gathering of campers and counselors with some group activities, and then would transition to a series of activities for the youth to do on their own, outside). The solar installation is going to support our values (as an environmental-focused adventure base, we try to model the values we teach through our programming) as well as help us financially (by covering the costs of heating, lighting and other electric needs, we’ll be saving a significant amount annually that we can, instead, invest directly in our youth and programming). This [grant] is going to have a huge impact on our nonprofit. We’re deeply grateful for the generosity (and the ease with which this support came through)."
-Mike Foote, Chief Empowerment Officer, DREAM
Environmental Benefit Equivalencies
608661
Pounds of Coal Burned
94
Homes' Electricity Use for 1 Year
721
Acres of U.S. Forest CO2 Sequestration for 1 Year

Solar Moonshot Questionnaire

Completing this questionnaire does not imply a grant request is approved. Grants with near-term installation plans will receive priority as it's the goal of the Solar Moonshot Program to get as much solar installed as quickly as possible to help mitigate the climate crisis.  Available funds are limited.

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